Learn the Truth About Your Illinois Rollover Accident

You might think that there is no one to blame but yourself after a rollover accident. However, even if you were the driver and no other vehicles were involved in the crash, you may not have caused the accident.

Who Caused the Rollover Crash?

It could’ve been you, but it is also possible that one of the following potential defendants caused your crash:

  • Another driver. Even without direct impact, another driver could cause your car to rollover. For example, if another driver crosses into your lane and you have to swerve to avoid a collision suddenly, then you may overcorrect your vehicle and it could tip over.
  • The manufacturer. Some vehicles may not be stable by design and may be more likely to roll over. Likewise, brake and tire problems can cause rollover crashes.
  • The mechanic. If you took your car in for repair and the mechanic failed to fix your tire or brake problems, then the mechanic could be legally responsible for the accident and resulting injuries.

A full investigation will need to be done to determine who caused your car accident rollover injuries.

Rollover Crash Injuries

Just as the cause of every rollover accident is unique, so too are the injuries suffered in a rollover wreck. During a rollover accident, the car roof may collapse, objects in the car may become projectiles, fires may start, and you may violently bump your body on the car. Accordingly, serious injuries can result, including:

  • Brain injuries. If your head hits any part of the car, the ground, or your skull bone, then you could suffer a traumatic brain injury.
  • Neck and back injuries. Neck and back injuries commonly occur when your body moves in an unnatural way at significant speed.
  • Spinal cord injuries. Complete spinal cord injuries are permanent. You may be paralyzed for the rest of your life.
  • Internal injuries. Not all injuries are visible or immediately noticeable. However, internal bleeding or damage to your lungs, kidneys, liver, heart, or other internal organs can be life-threatening.
  • Broken bone injuries. Any bone can break in a rollover wreck. Therefore, any pain or difficulty moving should be promptly reported to your doctor.
  • Amputation injuries. A finger, hand, arm, toe, foot, or leg may be severed in the accident or later due to extensive nerve damage or infection.
  • Burn injuries. It can be hard to get out of your car while the car is roof-down on the road. If there is a fire or explosion during the crash, then you may suffer burn injuries.

You may require extensive medical treatment for these injuries, including but not limited to: ambulance transport, surgeries, hospitalizations, doctors’ visits, physical therapy, occupational therapy, medications, and medical devices.

In addition to these medical expenses, you may lose time—and therefore, income—from work, you may have out-of-pocket costs, and you may experience significant physical pain and emotional suffering.

Don’t Pay for Rollover Accident Injuries You Didn’t Cause

Instead, fight for the full and fair legal recovery that you deserve from the party that caused your rollover wreck or that party’s insurance company.

It is easy to blame a rollover crash on the driver of the rolled-over vehicle, and you should expect any defendant that you name to do that to try to avoid paying your damages.

You need to fight hard to protect your rights, and you can start that fight today by contacting an experienced car accident lawyer to represent you. Once you hire a lawyer, your attorney will take over the day to day stresses of pursuing your legal recovery. You will have the time to focus on your physical recovery, your family, your job, and other things that are important to you while knowing that your legal rights are being protected.

Call us today for a free, no-obligation consultation. Let’s learn the truth about what happened to you and work toward your full and fair recovery.

Jason F. Abraham
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Managing Partner, Hupy and Abraham