Construction and maintenance are necessary to maintain and improve our roads. However, work zones can complicate traffic patterns and create risks for road workers and motorists.

Work Zone Dangers for Drivers and Passengers

Work zones are typically crowded places where workers and machinery are surrounded by traffic moving on narrow lanes. Some of the particular dangers include:

  • Debris. Roadwork can be a messy process. Sand, gravel, tar, and other foreign matter can end up on the highway. Drivers who swerve to avoid debris or who hit debris and lose control of their vehicles may be involved in collisions.
  • Degraded roads. Uneven roads, temporary lane shifts, and detours are common in construction zones.
  • Workers in traffic lanes. Flaggers and road construction workers may be in traffic lanes.
  • Other drivers. Distracted drivers, drivers who are in a hurry and annoyed by the construction-related slow down, and otherwise negligent drivers may cause collisions.

These factors make work zones risky, but you can take steps to avoid being in a work zone crash.

Tips When Approaching a Work Zone

Drivers may avoid work zone crashes by staying alert, remaining patient, and being courteous to other drivers. More specifically, a driver may:

  • Watch for signs of upcoming construction
  • Slow down when approaching a work zone
  • Be attentive and follow directions
  • Be ready for unexpected slow-downs and speed-ups
  • Leave enough room between their vehicle and the car in front of them
  • Keep their attention focused on driving safely and not getting distracted by the construction activity around them
  • Put down their phone. It is illegal to use a handheld cell phone in a Wisconsin work zone. Even hands-free devices may be distracting.

Limit Your Speed in Wisconsin Work Zones

Work zones typically have lower speed limits than what is usually allowed on the road. Lower speed limits help prevent accidents caused by narrow lanes, unexpected road turns, and stop-and-go traffic.

Drivers who speed in work zones may face significant fines and penalties, and they may cause dangerous accidents.

What to Do After a Wisconsin Work Zone Crash

You may have done everything right. Yet, a work zone collision occurred anyway. Work zone accidents are often complicated. Before you can recover damages, you must establish:

  • Who caused the accident. Another motorist may have caused your crash. A construction worker or other road workers may have caused your crash. In some cases, more than one party may be liable for the accident, including you.
  • That the accident caused your injuries. You may only recover damages for injuries caused by the work zone accident.
  • The extent of your injuries and the effect of the injuries on your life. The value of your accident damages must be known so that you can recover fair compensation for your past and future medical costs, lost income, out-of-pocket costs, physical pain, and emotional suffering.

Our experienced Wisconsin car accident lawyers will thoroughly investigate your accident to identify the right defendants and hold them accountable for your injuries.

Insurance companies know that we mean business and that we won’t settle for less than your case is worth. If the insurance company isn’t willing to provide you with a fair settlement, then we will take your case to trial and fight for your fair recovery.

You might be entitled to compensation for your damaged vehicle and any injuries you suffered. We invite you to order a free copy of our book, The Ultimate Guide for Automobile Accident Victimsto learn more about your rights and possible damages.

We also encourage you to contact our Wisconsin injury lawyers for a free, confidential, no-obligation case evaluation. We would be happy to meet with you by phone, video conference, in your home or hospital room, or our Milwaukee, Appleton, Green Bay, Madison, or Wausau office. Please call us, start a live chat with us, or complete our online contact form for more information about your rights and our Win or It’s Free Guarantee.


 

Jason F. Abraham
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Managing Partner, Hupy and Abraham