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How Your Teenager May Avoid an Attack in a Public Place—and What to Do If He’s Hurt

With every passing year your child is gaining a little more independence, but that independence is perhaps most pronounced in his or her middle to late teenage years. Your child, or many of his or her friends, has a driver’s license. Your child and his or her friends are going to amusement parks, movies, restaurants and malls in the Milwaukee area and throughout Wisconsin. You are worried not only about the dangers of driving to and from these places, but you may also be worried about the danger of your child being attacked or assaulted in parking lots or other areas.

Advice You Can Give Your Teen

While you can’t be with your child at all times, you can help protect your child by teaching him or her to:

  • Remain in a group. There may be safety in numbers.
  • Avoid parking lots, buildings, and other public areas that seem dark and empty. Dark, empty areas can be signs of insufficient security.
  • Always have a cell phone handy and not to hesitate to call 911 if he or she feels threatened.
  • Know what to do if a friend is attacked. Encourage your child to call for help immediately and not to put himself or herself in danger too.
  • Report any dangerous situations immediately.

Remember to speak to your teen at a time when your child is willing to listen to you so that you can be confident that you were heard.

What If It’s Too Late and Your Child’s Been Hurt?

If your child has been attacked then it is important to know all of your child’s rights and what you may be able to do to ensure a fair recovery. Your child may have a case against the property owner for negligent security. To learn more about whether this may apply to your child, please contact us directly for a free consultation. We also encourage you to follow our blog to stay up to date on important information for personal injury victims.

Jason F. Abraham
Managing Partner, Hupy and Abraham