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Do the Risks of SSRI Drugs Outweigh the Benefits for Pregnant Women?

Depression and the debate over of the use of SSRI anti-depressant drugs during pregnancy are not new topics. However, a study published in the October 31, 2012 issue of Human Reproduction looked at previous studies about the use of SSRIs during pregnancy and issued clear and direct recommendations that are important for expecting parents to know about.

What You Need to Know Now About SSRIs During Pregnancy

The study found that SSRI drugs used during pregnancy:

  • Raise the risk of miscarriage, premature birth, and health problems for mothers and babies. Health problems may include preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension.
  • Do not provide any documented benefit of a better health outcome for mothers or babies.
  • Were only as effective as, or slightly more effective than, placebos in treating depression during pregnancy.

Over the past two decades, antidepressant drug use has increased about 400 percent and antidepressants are currently the most common prescription for people between the ages of 18 to 44. While the study says that “great caution” should be taken before prescribing SSRI drugs to pregnant women, researchers also point out that depression should be treated during pregnancy. Other options that do not have the same risks as SSRI drugs should be considered and women who are considering SSRI drugs such as Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, and Lexapro should be well informed of the risks before taking or continuing with their medications.

What to Do If You or Your Child Has Been Hurt by an SSRI During Pregnancy

The public has not always known the information provided above. If you are one of the women who experienced an SSRI side effect during pregnancy, or if your child was injured, then it is important to protect your rights. Please call our Milwaukee based class action lawyers today to discuss your SSRI drug injury and possible recovery. Our experienced attorneys can be reached at 1-800-800-5678 or 414-223-4800.